C++ and 5 years’ relevant experience? Don’t call us….Part II

23 November 2014

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(continued from our last blog post)   

Nowadays, many employers don’t bother to acknowledge candidates’ applications, or to tell them if they have been unsuccessful.  The general rule seems to be, “if you don’t hear from us then you haven’t been successful.”

Candidates seeking their dream IT job are, justifiably, unhappy at this state of affairs.  However, increasingly this unhappiness manifests itself in the candidate not bothering to communicate with those who can help them land said dream job. I’ve noted a trend for some simply to regard a recruitment consultant as a vehicle to help them get a job but not make the effort to engage with the recruiter to share information that might achieve that end. They seem to think that providing a CV is all that is required. It’s not; a CV is the starting point, not the finishing point.

There are several reasons (apart from the obvious access to jobs) why candidates should strive to develop a relationship with a good recruitment consultant.   First, it’s human nature to try harder for those you like, so make your recruiter your friend. Secondly, circumstances, skills, qualifications and all those variables that influence potential employers do change, and if you have simply registered your CV with a recruitment agency but not updated it then who knows what you might miss out on?  And of course, if you have a good relationship, then in a few years’ time, when you want to move on to the next dream job, both parties will be far better placed to work together to their mutual benefit, especially if you have kept in touch in the interim.

Good recruitment consultants constantly seek to communicate with clients and candidates alike. We don’t always get it right, but we do try.  For one thing, it improves our knowledge of the specialist arena in which we work.  Constant contact with clients means we (might) get to know about a great job before a competitor, and if we have a great relationship with you, the ideal candidate for that job, you’re going to get first crack at it.  Similarly, keeping in touch with quality candidates also improves our knowledge of the market and of those small things, the personal qualities in particular, which make the critical difference when a client has two candidates with almost identical CVs.  Just one small piece of information – the equestrianism, skiing, hillwalking or dog that the candidate shares with the client – may make the difference between getting an interview or not (assuming, of course, that you have the necessary technical skills and experience of course!).

Feedback after interviews is the other area where candidates, rightly, complain they are missing out.  Here, good consultants are at an advantage, given that we do, invariably, receive details of what went wrong and what went right.  We’re only too happy to share them with candidates, for the simple reason that the information will help us to help you (the candidate) in the future. So please engage more – and we’ll all benefit!

Andrew Finlayson, Associate Director, Be-IT Resourcing

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